Should we always be encouraging learners to manage transitions?

English for Academic Study at the University of Glasgow organises a BALEAP PIM (Professional Issues Meeting) on 12 November 2016 on the theme of learner identity – managing transitions. The following reflection has been reposted from the event website.


Carol Irvine, the Steering Group Co-Ordinator for the BALEAP PIM at the University of Glasgow in November 2016, reflects on how she found the inspiration for the conference theme: learner identity – managing transitions.

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Coherence part 3: what did the students tell us?

Neil Allison presents part 3 of his 3 part investigation to uncover more about the problems of poor coherence in student writing, particularly East Asian writers. This post summarises the experiments/tasks he used in class and the observations and implications for student awareness of and improvement in writing coherent texts.  

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EAS Disciplinary Identity at the Interface between Theory and Practice

Olga Campbell-Thomson follows up on her earlier blog post about specific activities undertaken in the Speaking in Arts and Humanities course by providing a wider background discussion of the construction of disciplinary identity which draws on the work of Michel Foucault.

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Coherence part 2: what does the literature tell us?

In the last post Neil Allison started looking into coherence and now he presents part 2 of a 3 part investigation to uncover more about the problems of poor coherence in student writing, particularly East Asian writers. This post highlights some of the theory of coherence from a linguistics perspective and some research into issues for English language learners. Continue reading “Coherence part 2: what does the literature tell us?”

Is this Coherent, or, how to think like an English person

Neil Allison has been looking into issues of structure in writing, particularly East Asian writers and particularly at sentence and paragraph level. What makes students’ writing incoherent? This is part 1 of a series of posts considering what causes poor coherence and what can improve it.

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Critical Reflection in Action: A glance at my own teaching practice through the eyes of students

Clare Watson shares her thoughts about teaching along with the motivation underlying recent exploration into aspects of her own teaching practice, through the eyes of her students. She briefly suggests how teachers may empower themselves through the process of critical reflection and focuses on one simple tool, that of the ‘Critical Incident Questionnaire’.

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